Cerebral metastases

“Peter Bullock combines superb clinical judgement, scientific enquiry and an international gold standard of care with being deeply committed and caring towards his patients.”

Professor Justin Stebbing

Cerebral metastases are secondary cancers that occur in the brain following a primary cancer elsewhere in the body, such as the lung or the skin. It is often possible to remove solitary metastases in this group of patients, who are then likely to require further treatment.

Investigation

In order to build up a picture of your brain, and the rest of your body it will be important to undertake both CT brain and whole body as well as MR brain.

Treatment

Surgery: depending on their location in your brain, Peter Bullock is likely to remove all of the metastasis at surgery. On average, you will be in hospital for around three to five days.

Radiotherapy/Chemotherapy: whether you will be offered radiotherapy or chemotherapy, and what form it might take, depend on the site of your primary tumour – for instance, whether it is breast cancer, lung cancer, etc.

Follow-up: For more information on your particular condition, please contact Peter Bullock’s personal assistant, Sophie Nurowski on: 020 3219 3344 or 07880 886 405 or email: +@VAvl4{h.!kFsgf6qYI*/xdtM|n]`j]#[wI53cY~_TItT'`WUuaH&qsgNXV`^fVV